THE PRINCETON CLASSICS DEPARTMENT investigates the history, language, literature, and thought of ancient Greece and Rome. We use the perspectives of multiple disciplines to understand and imagine the diversity of these civilizations over almost two thousand years and to reflect on what the classical past has meant to later ages, and to our own.

Image of Ishion Hutchinson
FAGLES LECTURE

Hutchinson was born in Port Antonio, Jamaica, and is the author of two poetry collections, Far District and House of Lords and Commons. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Whiting Writers Award, the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award and the Larry Levis Prize from the Academy of American Poets, among others. He teaches in the graduate writing program at Cornell University and is a contributing editor to two literary journals.

Stained glass window of Princeton shield
Student Honors

The Department of Classics is happy to share the news that four classics majors were elected to Phi Beta Kappa: Nicolette D’Angelo, Kevin Duraiswamy, Alyssa Finfer, and Rafail Zoulis. The Phi Beta Kappa Society, founded in 1776 and the oldest of all national honorary scholastic societies, has a chapter at Princeton. Election to this chapter is based on scholastic standing and generally includes the highest-ranking tenth of each graduating class. Congratulations to all!

Joonho Jo
Student Award

We are pleased to announce that Joonho Jo, Class of 2021, is the winner of the Stinnecke Prize in 2019. It is given to the sophomore or junior who passes the best examination based on the Odes of Horace, Eclogues of Vergil, and the Latin Grammar and Prosody, as well as the Anabasis of Xenophon or Plato’s Euthyphro, Crito, Apology and Phaedo and the Greek Grammar. The winner receives a one-time stipend of $5,000. Sophomores and juniors in all departments are eligible to compete.

Rafail Zoulis
Student Honor

Zoulis, a classics major from Athens, says his experience of the events in Greece’s recent history has had a powerful impact on his intellectual and personal growth. “The most important element from this period was growing up during the financial crisis and the migration movements,” he said, giving him a particular interest in “transnational political and administrative units as well as a celebration of diversity.” Zoulis brings this current-day awareness to his studies of the past. You may read his address here.

Grace Sommers
Student Award

Sommers is a physics major from Bridgewater, New Jersey, and is also pursuing a certificate in Roman language and culture among others. She has been awarded a Goldwater Scholarship, an annual award for outstanding undergraduates interested in careers in mathematics, the natural sciences or engineering. See also a longer article in the Prince.

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