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Princeton Classics

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THE PRINCETON CLASSICS DEPARTMENT investigates the history, language, literature, and thought of ancient Greece and Rome. We use the perspectives of multiple disciplines to understand and imagine the diversity of these civilizations over almost two thousand years and to reflect on what the classical past has meant to later ages, and to our own.

Department News and Events

Ge'ez image
Featured

Ge’ez, or Classical Ethiopic, is one of the ancient world’s major literary languages, with two millennia of history in the Horn of Africa and Arabia. The language appears in many ancient inscriptions and in Jewish and Christian writings, even shaping the language of the Qur’an and early Muslim religious texts. It continues to live on today as the liturgical language of the Ethiopian and Eritrean Orthodox churches.

Emily Greenwood
Faculty Appointment

The Classics department welcomes our newest faculty member, Emily Greenwood, who will join Princeton as a Professor in both Classics and the University Center for Human Values. Her work spans Greek literature and language, reception studies, intellectual history, postcolonial studies and Black studies. Her vast expertise on the Classical world and its continuing influences today make her an important addition to the department. 

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Post-Event Reflection

Is strategic rationality a modern way of thinking? Not according to Josiah Ober, Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University, and formerly a professor at Princeton University. 

Rosa_Andujar
News

The London Hellenic book Prize 2020 has been awarded to Dr Rosa Andújar’s (KCL) edition of The Greek Trilogy of Luis Alfaro: Electricidad; Oedipus El Rey; Mojada (Bloomsbury/Methuen Drama) -- Mexican-American playwright Luis Alfaro's highly original cultural and linguistic adaptations of Sophocles’ Electra and Oedipus Rex and Euripides’ Medea to the life of urban/ immigrant Latinx communities in Los Angeles.

Andrew_Feldherr_Book_edit
Faculty Publication

What type of effort goes into writing about Roman historian and politician Sallust?

The work of extruding an argument from [my] prose, Feldherr posits, “...is like eating stinky cheese through a straw.” An interesting image to be sure. If this piques your curiosity regarding the method the writer and Princeton University professor uses to answer profound questions about Sallust’s motives and integrity in his writings pick up a copy of  “After the Past, Sallust on History and Writing History” available June 2021.

image Gygax
Faculty Interview

Marc Domingo Gygax is Director of the Program in the Ancient World and Professor of Classics. His new book “Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity” was co-edited by Arjan Zuiderhoek (Universiteit Gent) and published by Cambridge University Press in December 2020. In this interview, Professor Gygax talks about his research into public gifts in ancient Greek cities. 

Thucydides on asymmetrical relations between states Rationality and its limits
News

Program in the Ancient World will be hosting the Magie Lecture featuring Josiah Ober.

Thucydides on asymmetrical relations between states: Rationality and its limits.

Thursday, April 22, 2021

4:30 PM  - 6:00 PM

Lecture will be presented via Zoom

2021 Classics Newsletter
Newsletter

The department's annual newsletter is now available online and paper copies have been mailed.

Inside you can find updates from faculty and students, an article by alumna Erynn Kim '17, a fascinating interview with Presidential Postdoctoral Research Fellow Erika Valdivieso, Clem Brown's '21, winemaking research project and so much more!

CLASSICAL MATTERS

Stories recommended by faculty, students, and alumni (submit suggestion)