THE PRINCETON CLASSICS DEPARTMENT investigates the history, language, literature, and thought of ancient Greece and Rome. We use the perspectives of multiple disciplines to understand and imagine the diversity of these civilizations over almost two thousand years and to reflect on what the classical past has meant to later ages, and to our own.

Post-Event Reflection

Sara Magrin, associate professor of Classics at UC Berkeley, spoke on Princeton’s campus on Tuesday, December 4th, delivering a lecture entitled “Being of Two Minds: Plotinus’ Account of Psychological Conflict in Ennead 4.3.31.”

Nicolette D'Angelo
Student Award

“Nicolette is able to combine a commitment to understanding the ancient world on its own terms with making it speak to contemporary concerns,” said Yelena Baraz, associate professor of classics. “All the work Nicolette does, academic and creative, is personally meaningful. From her first day in the Humanities Sequence she has intensely engaged with the tradition we were teaching and, in her engagement, she was both transforming it and preparing to add to it.”

Photograph of Pantheon floor
Post-Event Reflection

Update: the recording is now available.

On the evening of Thursday, November 15th, Christopher B. Krebs, associate professor of Classics at Stanford, spoke on Princeton’s campus, delivering an engaging and energizing Prentice Lecture entitled “Classics As Crime Fiction: A Conversation with Caesar, Labienus, and Polybius.” Despite mother nature’s best efforts, the event was well-attended, and the Q&A period produced an…

Painting of figures holding musical instruments
Faculty Award

We are delighted to pass on the good news that our colleague Harriet Flower has won a Goodwin Award from the Society for Classical Studies for her book The Dancing Lares and the Serpent in the Garden: Religion at the Roman Street Corner. Only three of these awards are given annually, and they are recognized as the highest honor for books published in our field. Congratulations too to our alumna Amy Richlin (Class of ’73, and last year’s Faber Lecturer) who received the same prize.

Students seated at dining table
Student-Led Event

Interested in speaking Latin or ancient Greek? Speaking is an excellent way to solidify your grasp of grammar and vocabulary and to learn how to understand Latin and Greek as what they are — languages and not puzzles. It’s also great fun! The Latin table meets at 7pm on Thursdays in Whitman dining hall, and the Greek table meets at 5pm on Mondays. All are welcome. If you have any questions, please contact Kevin Duraiswamy ’19.

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